Caraboo Loops
Edging Home

Edging Home

December 7, 2020

This is the last episode before Christmas and we have a special episode for you from Leeds based artist and writer, Samra Mayanja.

Samra Mayanja moved to the town of Harwich (Essex Coast) when she was about 5 years old.  Just before Christmas break  in year 9 her English teacher Miss Limer handed her a Tesco carrier bag full of books, books by black female writers including Toni Morrison and Maya Angelou and Malorie Blackman.

Over the last couple of years Samra has trekked to different towns on the British coast talking to people about change. Now Samra is returning to Harwich, the place of her childhood, in search of her school teachers and begins to reimagine from this pocket of the country and of her memory.

Content warnings for the podcast are: mention of violence, death and enslavement. 
 
Intro music: Siem Arli - Forever
 

 

 

 

Thinking with Eels

Thinking with Eels

October 26, 2020

Whilst walking along a river, near the outskirts of the city of Bristol, researcher & writer Ben GJ Thomas came across a faded noticeboard, likely put up by the council during a more utopian time of public education. There were big italic letters, and a drawing of an eel with what can only be described as a grin. The board explained how eels start life in the Sargasso Sea, just north of Bermuda; a space both mythic and real in equal measure. They are carried along the gulf stream, up the coast of North America then out across the Atlantic. As such, eels populate river systems on both sides of the ocean. Here in the River Severn, young eels arrive on a high tide in late spring. They choose to call this river home for many decades before returning across the ocean once more, to reproduce and ultimately die.

In this episode,  Ben explores the role of eels in shaping lives across both shores of the Atlantic. The story takes us on a journey from a monastery in medieval England, to the fight to uphold Indigenous fishing practices across so-called Canada today. Through conversations with writers and philosophers, we explore why eels matter, asking what it means to think alongside this endangered creature.

Cassette Letters

Cassette Letters

September 6, 2020

In this episode researcher and creative producer Fozia Ismail explores the use of cassette tapes in the Somali Community during migration. Through conversations with other artists, archivists and musicians we learn about the emergence of tape, its appropriation by different diaspora communities to send messages to families in other countries, and the ethical questions raised on how these remaining tapes are preserved and used today.

Growing up in the UK, Fozia remembers her family recording on cassette tapes and sending them to relatives abroad. Some of these tapes she later found still remain today, offering a rich and important snapshot of Somali oral tradition and culture before and after the onset of the civil war.

 Fozia also spoke with Wajid Yaseen, artist and director of the sound art research cooperative Modus Arts, about his work Tape Letters, archivist Ibrahim Hirsi about Waaberi Phone, founded to support Somali artists in taking ownership over their music and intellectual property, artist and poet Asmaa Jama about her own families experiences around cassette tapes, and Hainbach, an electronic music composer and performer to talk about Destruction Loops, work which uses sharp or abrasive objects including a scalpel, a boxcutter and sandpaper on tape loops that contained recordings of hateful comments from youtube channels.

The Plotlanders

The Plotlanders

August 2, 2020

The Plotlanders were a radical DIY community who acquired plots of land through auction after the agricultural depression in the late 19th century. Mainly consisting of working class people, they acquired plots of lands from £5 a plot. The Plotlanders held ‘back to the land’ ambitions and built weekend retreats and smallholdings through alternative processes and local salvaged materials. However, in 1949 Basildon was designated as a New Town, which led to the compulsory purchase and demolition of the Plotlands.

In this episode, we dive into the phenomena of the Plotlanders with artist Shaun C Badham and explore them in context with current issues of land ownership, the self-build movement, and artist projects that re-address our relationship with land, agriculture and each other. As we’re waking up to a new landscape post COVID-19, some people are beginning to reflect if they can continue do their jobs remotely, there-fore the requirement to live in or as close to a city is questioned. More seriously the pandemic has spotlighted the inequities of access to green and outdoor space in lower income neighbourhoods and its impact on the health of its communities.

Rough Music

Rough Music

June 23, 2020

This episode explores the folk custom, Rough Music in relation to public shaming with Bristol based artist Jessica Akerman. Rough Music was and is found in many societies across the globe. In this episode we concentrate mainly on Rough Music in the UK, but look further afield to examine how similar forms of cultural expression are used for the purposes of humiliation and protest, but also celebration and community cohesion.

To get a snapshot of Rough Music and public shame in this moment in time, we spoke to a composer and sound artist about his work reviving rough music, a folk music researcher on the history of rough music, an art historian and a musicologist on the role that music and noisemaking plays in protest, shame and social justice. We also spoke to one of the biggest MCs on the battle rap scene in the USA about public shaming as performance and the feeling of being on the wrong side of the crowd, as well as her thoughts on the role of chanting and noise making at the recent Black Lives Matter marches she attended in New York.

Sightings / Hidden Histories

Sightings / Hidden Histories

June 6, 2020

In this first episode of the Caraboo Projects Podcast we get weird stories from the Hidden Histories tape recorder, tales from local heroes on the high street, and get the perspective of a life long Bedminster resident.

Stay tuned for more local stories and histories hidden, and not so hidden.

Established in 2018 Caraboo Projects is a contemporary art organisation based in Bristol.

Javasu

Javasu

May 2, 2019

In this episode of the Caraboo Projects podcast we listen in on a conversation between artists Savinder Bual and Sarah Boulton as they discuss the themes around our latest exhibition, Javasu, and the connections between their work. 

Stay tuned for more local stories and histories hidden, and not so hidden.

Established in 2018 Caraboo Projects is a contemporary art organisation based in Bristol.

Jurassic Moon

Jurassic Moon

February 28, 2019

In this episode of the Caraboo Projects podcast we explore the themes of the latest exhibition, Jurassic Moon. Curator Mary Roberts-Holmes tells us about storytelling and conflicting narratives plus we speak to a local chicken shop and discuss white tree roundabout on Bristol's Downs.

Stay tuned for more local stories and histories hidden, and not so hidden.

Established in 2018 Caraboo Projects is a contemporary art organisation based in Bristol.

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